geography

Dimensions of Political Ecology Conference

The Dimensions of Political Ecology Conference (DOPE) is organized and hosted entirely by an interdisciplinary group of graduate and undergraduate students at the University of Kentucky. Since its inception in 2010, this student-organized conference has become one of the largest, most highly regarded international forums for critical discussions at the intersection of ecology, political economy, and science studies. DOPE 2020 welcomes Dr. Alaka Wali, Dr. Diana Ojeda, Dr. Justin Dunnavant, Dr. Macarena Gómez-Barris, and Dr. Rebecca Elmhirst as our speakers, along with many professors, graduate students, and undergraduate students. The DOPE Conference offers a platform for both established and emerging scholars to present research and engage in political ecology scholarship.

Date: 
Thursday, February 27, 2020 - 9:00am to Saturday, February 29, 2020 - 10:00pm
Location: 
University of Kentucky

New Maps Plus student wins national cartography award

At the 2018 North American Cartographic Information Society (NACIS) annual meeting, New Maps Plus student Kerry Gathers was awarded first prize in the student Dynamic Map competition.  Kerry's beautifully stylized and interactive map (https://www.kgmaps.com/oil-and-bone/) highlights the rise and fall of the whaling industry of the 1800's, and includes fascinating narratives at key points.  Well done Kerry!

Tags:

PATH EXTINCTION & REINFORCEMENT

The development and change over time (evolution) of geomorphic, soil, hydrological, and ecosystems (Earth surface systems; ESS) is often, perhaps mostly, characterized by multiple potential developmental trajectories. That is, rather than an inevitable monotonic progression toward a single stable state or climax or mature form, often there exist multiple stable states or potentially unstable outcomes, and multiple possible developmental pathways. Until late in the 20th century, basic tenets of geosciences, ecology, and pedology emphasized single-path, single-outcome conceptual models such as classical vegetation succession; development of mature, climax, or zonal soils; or attainment of steady-state or some other form of stable equilibrium. As evidence accumulated of ESS evolution with, e.g., nonequilibrium dynamics, alternative stable states, divergent evolution, and path dependency, the "headline" was the existence of > 2 potential pathways, contesting and contrasting with the single-path frameworks. Now it is appropriate to address the question of why the number of actually observed pathways is relatively small.The purpose of this post is to explore why some developmental sequences are rare vs. common; why some are non-recurring (path extinction), and some are reinforced.

THE GEOMORPHOLOGICAL NICHE OF TREES

In a 2009 article I introduced the concept of a geomorphological niche, defined as the resources available to drive or support a particular geomorphic process (the concept has not caught on). The niche is defined in terms of a landscape evolution space (LES), given by

where H is height above a base level, rho is the density of the geological parent material, g is the gravity constant, and A is surface area. The k’s are factors representing the inputs of solar energy and precipitation, and Pgrepresents the geomorphically significant proportion of biological productivity (see this for the  background and justification).

BREAKAGE VS. UPROOTING & HILLSLOPE GEOMORPHOLOGY

Just published in Geomorphology:

Samonil, P., Danek, P., Adam, D., Phillips, J.D. 2017. Breakage or uprooting: how tree death affects hillslope processes in old-growth temperate forestsGeomorphology 299: 276-284. 

The abstract is below:

Posted 14 November 2017

 

Community as a Minor Utopia

Date: 
Wednesday, October 4, 2017 - 4:00pm
Location: 
Gatton, Room 311

AXIOMS OF GEOMORPHOLOGY

Axiomatic approaches to science and mathematics depend on an underlying set of statements, principles, or propositions that apply to all situations within the domain of study. The axioms run the gamut from undisputed universal laws to widely or even universally accepted but unproved or unprovable generalizations, to propositional stipulations adopted for analytical convenience or because they raise interesting questions.

Examples abound in mathematics and formal logic, and in science, engineering and technological applications of math and logic. Although it is only occasionally referred to as such, the laws of stratigraphy (details in any geology textbook) form an axiomatic approach to sedimentology, sedimentary geology, and related palaeoenvironmental studies. The laws of original horizontality, lateral continuity, superposition, and cross-cutting relationships are assumed in this approach to apply to all sedimentary deposits, and therefore form an axiomatic system for interpretation.

Tips for NSF proposals in the Social Sciences

Dr. Jeffrey Mantz will go through the basics of NSF applications, talk about specific programs, and give some general grant writing advice. Mantz is Program Director in Cultural Anthropology and Human Subjects Research Officer at the National Science Foundation, where he has served since 2012. He holds a PhD in Anthropology from the University of Chicago and has previously taught at George Mason University, Cornell University, California State University at Stanislaus, and Vassar College. His own research takes him to the Caribbean and Central Africa, where he explores issues related to inequality, resource extraction, and commodity supply chains.

Date: 
Thursday, September 22, 2016 - 12:00pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
18th Floor, Patterson Office Tower
Type of Event (for grouping events):

Introduction to New Maps Plus

Why New Maps Plus?

The New Maps Plus graduate programs at the University of Kentucky offer students a challenging, intensive, digital mapping curriculum that emphasizes the acquisition of technical skills—coding, GIS, web development—while also preparing students to critically address the complexity of today’s information ecosystem.

Read more about how New Maps Plus is unique: newmapsplus.uky.edu/all-about

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - geography
X
Enter your linkblue username.
Enter your linkblue password.
Secure Login

This login is SSL protected

Loading