News

11/13/2009

Kevin Harrelson discovered the works of 17th century Dutch philosopher Baruch Spinoza and early-19th century German philosopher Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel while an undergraduate philosophy major at Villanova University. 

Their writing—and their questions—captivated him. His readings of Hegel led to an interest in German Idealism in general, and led him to pursue his doctorate in philosophy at the University of Kentucky. 

“There were a lot of people at UK studying German Idealism, and it was a good place to pursue that,” said Harrelson, who completed his Ph.D. at UK in 2004.

Harrelson is now in his first year as visiting assistant professor in the Department of Philosophy and Religion at Ball State University. 

His first book, “

11/13/2009

by Rebekah Tilley

photos by Lee Thomas

“Welcome to Mathland” reads the white board in the seventh floor hallway of Patterson Office Tower, home to the UK Department of Mathematics. Above it is the mathematical equivalent of a joke; the punch line accessible only to those who know the difference between a function and a formula.

Katharine Ott came to this particular “Mathland” by way of a National Science Foundation Mathematical Sciences Postdoctoral Research Fellowship. The fellowship is highly competitive, both for its prestige, and because the applicants are able to choose at which university they want to conduct research.

“Given the kind of research I do, the University of Kentucky was far and away the first choice of where I wanted to come,” Ott said. “Russell Brown, department chair Zhongwei Shen and John Lewis are just a few of the

10/22/2009

At the end of every big chapter of our lives, we are faced with tough choices. As I was applying for graduate schools, I was overwhelmed by the opportunities that awaited... somehow in the jungle of choices, everyone finds one that seems most appropriate at the moment, chooses it, and hopes that it proves to be a good one for the future. These choices define us in some way. In case of graduate school, this choice defines us as mathematicians. In this sense, I have chosen the perfect department.

First of all, I came to graduate school torn between a few areas of mathematics and wasn't quite sure how to choose one. So I took classes in all of these areas during the first two years, and have had a chance to meet faculty that were happy to discuss research problems in each area. I was very happy with the choices I had! Also, during these first years I had a chance to read recent

10/19/2009

Alumna Caroline Light says she feels like ending up at the University of Kentucky for her graduate studies “was the luckiest break.”

Light is now the Director of Studies in the Women, Gender and Sexuality program at Harvard University. The research and teaching skills she gained while at UK have helped her get to where she is now, she said.

10/9/2009

By all accounts, Allen Turner is a long way from home.

A University of Kentucky alumnus twice over, Turner is in Guadalajara, Mexico and about to complete a program that will allow him to teach English as a foreign language. When he is finished, Turner, 69, and his wife plan to move to Ecuador where they own a small sugar cane farm.

Once in Ecuador, Turner hopes to teach and to research how birds relate to culture.

Meanwhile, he is still serving as a legal consultant to the Gabrieleno Band of Mission Indians who are fighting to be recognized as a tribe by the U.S. government.

The anthropologist, lawyer and teacher has certainly kept busy since he left the College of Arts & Sciences in 1981.

“They’re all dimensions of what I’ve been able to do in my life so far,” Turner said. “You couldn’t put me in a box if you tried.”

Turner is

9/25/2009

Earth & Environmental Sciences Undergraduate Trevor Strosnider
by Sarah Vos

For work this summer, Trevor Strosnider, a junior majoring in geology, donned a hard hat and descended into a Nevada gold mine. He identified rocks and fault lines, measured how far mining tunnels had been extended and used that information to help the Newmont Mining Corporation find gold.

Before he left for Nevada, Strosnider had no idea what he would be doing at the mine. He learned of the internship after a representative from Newmont, one of the world’s largest gold producers, made a presentation at UK. A professor encouraged him to apply, even though Strosnider didn’t think he was qualified. He had studied geology at UK, but did not specialize in gold mining and mineral extraction.

But a few weeks later the offer came: $20 an hour, 40 hours a week, to work in the company’s

9/25/2009
Sophronia Taylor

Anthropology Senior


For Sophronia Caress Taylor, attending college was never really a dream, it was an expectation.

Descended from a line that includes graduates of Mississippi Valley State University, Mississippi State University and Alcorn State University, Taylor knew college was in her future, but the college she attended was not set in stone. Because she had lived part of her life in Laurel, Miss., Taylor had aspirations of attending a historically black college like Alcorn State or Spelman. However, having graduated from Mason County High School in Northern Kentucky, she was placed in perfect position to study at the University of Kentucky.

Taylor came to UK on a William C. Parker scholarship and has not looked back. In searching for a college home on the UK campus, Taylor found the College of Arts and Sciences to be one of the more

9/25/2009
Madison Young

Political Science Senior

by Lisa L. Beeler

Madison Lee Young, a junior in political science, bled blue before she even moved to UK from Ft. Lauderdale, FL her freshman year of college. Her father played football at UK from 1977 - 1981. He shared a dorm with UK’s current assistant football coach, Chuck Smith. Young was bred to love UK. “When I was born, I didn’t have a normal mobile over my crib. Instead, my mobile was made of tiny UK wildcats,” said Young.

Young is currently studying for the law school entrance exam and will be applying to law schools soon. She was recently invited to take part in an internship in Washington, D.C. this summer at The Washington Center. She will be interning at America’s Most Wanted in Washington, D.C..

Young graduated from the Citizens’ Police Academy last year and it sparked her interests in working

9/25/2009
Rachel Dunnagan

Graduate student

by Sara Cunningham

Rachel Dunnagan has always been as dedicated to the education of others as she is to her own education.

Teaching comes natural to the math and classics senior.

Her love of education began with creating pretend assignments for her younger sister when they played school as children and continued with Dunnagan’s devotion to helping her classmates with their studies in high school.

The Louisville native was scheduled to graduate summa cum laude with a Bachelor of Arts degree in math and a second Bachelor of Arts degree in Classics this past spring, and plans to progress to a graduate program to continue preparing herself for a long career in teaching math and Latin to

9/25/2009
Amanda Hatton

Psychology Junior

by Sara Cunningham

Amanda Hatton’s honesty and passion shines as she talks about the challenges she’s faced and how those challenges have shaped her goals.

“Five years ago, I had a big setback in my life,” the psychology junior said.

On Aug. 9, 2003, Hatton and her boyfriend were in a serious car accident on their way out to her family’s farm in Woodford County. Hatton’s boyfriend was killed and Hatton was badly injured. She spent two months in a coma, Hatton said.

“I had a closed-head injury and when I did finally wake up, there was so much I didn’t remember and I had to relearn how to do a lot,” she said.

But Hatton said she found strength in her experience and in her family. She is the youngest of seven children.

"When my accident happened, I was a student at LCC and I had to take that fall

9/25/2009

 

Susan (Camenisch) Eriksson started her studies at UK as a music major, with a focus on piano. But when she took an honors section of geology during her junior year, she was hooked.

“After one exam, I went up to the TA and said, I love this, I love, this, I love this!” she recalls. “I was so excited. I said I wished I had found geology as a freshman.”

Eventually, her UK professors—particularly Dr. Bill Blackburn—helped Eriksson make the switch to majoring in geology as a junior, and she was able to graduate with just one extra semester of

9/25/2009

Jason Cummins’ employer gave him a three-year, full-tuition college scholarship, sent him to flight school, paid him to attend one of the most prestigious MBA programs in the country, and asked him to teach economics at West Point. In May, the UK Class of 1993 alum returned to take up the leadership of the UK Army ROTC program; the same program from which he himself graduated 16 years ago.

Cummins’ office walls in Barker Hall display a scrapbook of his Army career: the tail rotor blade from an Apache helicopter, the flag of the 101st Airborne, his MBA diploma from The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, a cavalry sabre, and unit pictures from Iraq

9/25/2009

There is one 12 or 13-year-old female, with great dental work, that he can’t get out of his mind. This is a case that haunts him.

“I can’t ID her,” said Bill Bass, one of the world’s leading forensic anthropologists and alumnus of UK’s College of Arts and Sciences. “There are cold cases, but they are never really that cold. We are constantly talking about them and there are new techniques that are coming out all the time that may break the case.”

Originally from Stephens City, Va., Bass came to Kentucky in the early 50s after being

9/18/2009
by Robin Roenker

Katherine Osborne knew UK’s Department of English was the right graduate program for her the moment she met then-DGS Ellen Rosenman during a campus tour.

"She talked about her work, but she was more interested in me,” said Osborne, a Frankfort, Ky., native and graduate of Hanover College in Indiana. “I could tell she was interested in graduate students. That was evident from the get-go. She just completely turned me on to the program.”

Now in her fifth year at UK, Osborne’s interest in 19th-century British literature has flourished under Rosenman’s mentoring. Osborne credits two of Rosenman’s courses—one on George Eliot and the other on material objects in the Victorian age—as the impetus for

9/17/2009
Political Science Ph.D. Student

by Rebekah Tilley

Third-year political science graduate student Jonathan Powell is an early riser. By 6:30 each morning the Kentucky native is usually hiking up to Patterson Office Tower to start his day. Yet political science professor Dr. Daniel Morey always manages to beat him there.

“Dan is literally here at 5:00 AM every day. When I’m walking up I can see where his office is and the light’s always on. One day I hope I’ll be here before him but it’s probably never going to happen,” Powell said, shaking his head.

The hard working habits of both professor and student paid off recently when Powell’s paper titled “Determinants of the Occurrence and Outcome of Coups d’etat” was the grand prize winner of the graduate student paper competition at the Annual Meeting of the International Studies Association – South.

9/14/2009

by Laura Sutton

photos by Lee Thomas and Brian Connors Manke

“It’s necessary for human beings to establish laws for themselves and live according to laws, or they differ in no way from the beasts that are the most savage in every way.”

(874e-875a, tr. Thomas Pangle).

In Plato’s “Laws,” the philosopher sketches the basic political structure and laws for a proposed colony in Crete. During the Workshop on Plato’s Laws participants will concern themselves with engagement in a similar political community. The anticipated event takes place at the University of Kentucky on March 26-28, 2009.

While conference-goers won’t be founding a city as happens in the “Laws,” the group will be undergoing some of the same processes by creating standards, norms and

9/14/2009

by Laura Sutton

photos by Lee Thomas and Brian Connors Manke

“It’s necessary for human beings to establish laws for themselves and live according to laws, or they differ in no way from the beasts that are the most savage in every way.”

(874e-875a, tr. Thomas Pangle).

In Plato’s “Laws,” the philosopher sketches the basic political structure and laws for a proposed colony in Crete. During the Workshop on Plato’s Laws participants will concern themselves with engagement in a similar political community. The anticipated event takes place at the University of Kentucky on March 26-28, 2009.

While conference-goers won’t be founding a city as happens in the “Laws,” the group will be undergoing some of the same processes by creating standards, norms and

9/14/2009

by Laura Sutton

photos by Lee Thomas and Brian Connors Manke

“It’s necessary for human beings to establish laws for themselves and live according to laws, or they differ in no way from the beasts that are the most savage in every way.”

(874e-875a, tr. Thomas Pangle).

In Plato’s “Laws,” the philosopher sketches the basic political structure and laws for a proposed colony in Crete. During the Workshop on Plato’s Laws participants will concern themselves with engagement in a similar political community. The anticipated event takes place at the University of Kentucky on March 26-28, 2009.

While conference-goers won’t be founding a city as happens in the “Laws,” the group will be undergoing some of the same processes by creating standards, norms and

9/2/2009

 

by Rebekah Tilley
photos by Tim Collins

George Patton once said that “Compared to war, all other forms of human endeavor shrink to insignificance.”

An idea verified all too clearly these days; we cannot turn on the television or open a newspaper without being confronted with the harsh realities of contemporary conflict. Two professors in the UK Department of Political Science have made war the focus of their research: Daniel Morey and Clayton Thyne.

Morey has the posture and clean-cut look of a man with a military background – though neither he nor anyone in his immediate family has an extensive history of military service. Morey’s research focuses on three aspects of international conflict: why conflicts start, the duration of

5/7/2009
John Yozwiak

 

Was it destiny or some predisposition that led John Yozwiak to the University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences? Or maybe it simply was a matter of finding a great opportunity.

Yozwiak, whose grandfather was the dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Youngstown State University, was born in Binghamton, N.Y., but found himself relocated with his family to Lexington, Ky., when he was six.

Upon graduating from Lexington Catholic High School in 1990, Yozwiak, who comes from a long line of college graduates, knew that college was certainly the next step. He used his experiences from visiting friends at UK as well as his desire to stay close to home in choosing his collegiate destination.

“My family has always valued education. Therefore, attending college was very important to me,” Yozwiak said. “In part, I decided to attend the University of

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