anthropology

Negotiating Life: Resilience in an Era of the China Dream

Ecological practices of daily life have taken on new urgency and approaches as consumer citizens increasingly voice awareness of environmental sustainability in China. This lecture will focus on "everyday ecologies"--personal engagement with social and material worlds to negotiate well-being. 

Professor Nancy Chen is Chair of the Anthropology Department and an affiliate of East Asian Studies and Feminist Studies at UC/Santa Cruz. Her research interests include Chinese biotechnology, food and medicine, and alternative healing practices. She is author or editor of six books, including China Urban

Sponsored by the Department of Anthropology and the UK Confucius Institute. 

 

Date: 
Friday, September 15, 2017 - 3:30pm
Location: 
White Hall Classroom Building Rm 106

Rayna Rapp - Banking on DNA: Thinking About New Genetic Tests in Comparative Context

16th Annual Distinguished Lecture Series

October 21, 2016 Anthropology Graduate Student Association College of Arts and Sciences University of Kentucky

Reconstructing Anthropogenic Landscapes with Drone-mounted Sensors

Date: 
Friday, October 28, 2016 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
White Hall CB 114
Type of Event (for grouping events):

Meinarti: the 1500 year history of a Nubian village told by stratigraphy

Meinarti wine press

Date: 
Friday, September 23, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:45pm
Location: 
Lafferty Hall Room 108
Type of Event (for grouping events):

Tips for NSF proposals in the Social Sciences

Dr. Jeffrey Mantz will go through the basics of NSF applications, talk about specific programs, and give some general grant writing advice. Mantz is Program Director in Cultural Anthropology and Human Subjects Research Officer at the National Science Foundation, where he has served since 2012. He holds a PhD in Anthropology from the University of Chicago and has previously taught at George Mason University, Cornell University, California State University at Stanislaus, and Vassar College. His own research takes him to the Caribbean and Central Africa, where he explores issues related to inequality, resource extraction, and commodity supply chains.

Date: 
Thursday, September 22, 2016 - 12:00pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
18th Floor, Patterson Office Tower
Type of Event (for grouping events):

UK Archaeologists Protect and Restore Precious Artifacts Found in Mammoth Cave During Extensive Underground Renovations

Becoming Farmer, Becoming Workers: Agriculture and Industrial Gold Mining in Papua New Guinea.

Comparing ethnographic and agricultural data collected from two neighboring Biangai villages (Morobe Province, Papua New Guinea), one engaged in a small-scale conservation effort and the other stakeholders in a large industrial gold mine, this paper analyzes the linkages between alternative development regimes, agricultural transformation and human-environmental relations. Working the land is not simply about production, but also about knowing the landscape and its products as nodes in human social relations. Mining regimes disentangle the multi-species networks experienced in the garden, and reassemble them into other spaces. Thus, in the mining inspired transformations of agricultural practices, Biangai are also transforming how they experience their own multi-species community – its past, present and future.

 

Sponsored by the Department of Anthropology Colloquium Series.

Date: 
Friday, April 22, 2016 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Rm. 102, Whitehall Classroom Bldg.
Tags/Keywords:

Moving Mountains and Liberating Dialogues: My Life as a Black Feminist Archaeologist

The works of African descendant women describing our own experiences has always been the most reliable source for my developing a coherent theoretical dialogue about women in captivity and beyond. Black Feminist Archaeology, therefore, demonstrates through an analysis of the material past a method to positively enhance the texture and depth of how we understand the experiences of captive African peoples and further creates an archaeology that can be directly linked to the larger quest for social and political justice.

Date: 
Thursday, March 24, 2016 - 4:00pm
Location: 
Whitehall Classroom Bldg Rm. 102
Tags/Keywords:

Peachy-Keen: Tracing the Introduction of Peaches (Prunus persica) into the Americas

This talk demonstrates how plant remains can be used to trace food pathways in the modern day. The plant is peaches and the talk will examine pits recovered from a Mission period archaeological site located on Sapelo Island, one of the Georgia Sea Islands, where UK Dept of Anthropology archaeologist Dr. R. Jefferies is conducting excavations and research.

Date: 
Friday, February 19, 2016 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Whitehall Classroom Building Rm. 102
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