News

7/30/2012

Networked Humanities: From Within and Without the University
A Digital Humanities Symposium
February 15-16, 2013
The University of Kentucky
Writing, Rhetoric, and Digital Media Program

http://network.as.uky.edu

Keynote Speakers:
Kathleen Stewart, Professor of Anthropology, University of Texas

Malcolm McCullough, Professor of Architecture, University of Michigan

Of all the topics of interest to the digital humanities, the network has received little attention among digital humanities proponents. Yet, we live in a networked society: texts, sound, ideas, people, movements, consumerism, protest movements, politics, entertainment, academia,

7/27/2012
seedleaf garden

 

By Sarah Geegan

                                                          

For the Central Kentucky Council for Peace and Justice, it was an opportunity to reorganize youth programs; for the nonprofit Seedleaf, it was a way to better connect with volunteers; and for students in geography Professor Matt Wilson's class, it was the chance to apply their skills to engage with the Lexington community.

Students in Wilson's Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Workshop course spent the past semester applying their knowledge of geographic technology from the classroom to assist real

7/26/2012

Below is a Chinese newspaper article on Department of Biology professor Carol Baskin that originally ran in the Morning News and was written by Yankuang Su. There is also a letter attachment from Xinjiang Agricultural University inviting Baskin to give several guest lectures and congratulating her on her “Tianshan Award.”

Wearing a simple patterned shirt, light-colored pants and a pair of golden-colored glasses, this tall and scientific-looking woman is American professor Carol Baskin.

Carol Baskin is a professor at the University of Kentucky. In 2006, she and her husband Professor Jerry Baskin made their first academic visit to Xinjiang when they started

7/26/2012

By Mack McCormick, Amanda Osborne, Whitney Hale

 

Outwardly, it would appear that Arab and Jewish immigrants comprise two distinct groups with differing cultural backgrounds and an adversarial relationship. Often ignored, however, are the similar immigrant paths these two groups face in the United States, particularly in non-urban areas lacking established immigrant or ethnic populations. In regions like Kentucky, where Jewish and Arab populations are nearly invisible and established cultural or immigrant circles are not prevalent, both groups must negotiate complex identities and often find that their new locations illuminate more similarities between them than differences.

In "Arab and Jewish Women in Kentucky: Stories of Accommodation and Audacity," University of

7/20/2012

By Colleen Glenn

“Welcome to the first day of class everybody.  Let’s go over the syllabus so you know what to expect in this course.”

For UK students taking Statistics 210 this summer, these familiar words have taken on new meaning. Students meet their instructors not when they enter the classroom, but when they log onto their computers.

STA 210, or Introduction to Statistical Reasoning, is one of several online courses that the College of Arts & Sciences offers in the summertime. Citing greater flexibility and hectic schedules, more and more students are opting to take this UK Core requirement online.

“I chose to take the online course as opposed to the

7/19/2012

 

In May 2012 Ron Pen joined a delegation of UK faculty and students that visited Shanghai University to participate in three days of academic discourse, conversation and presentations. Students from Shanghai University welcomed the summit program through a night of many traditional Chinese performances. Pen also performed Appalachian music such as; Frog Went a Courting, Moonlight, and Cool of The Day.

Pen kept a journal of his experiences during the trip, which you can read here.

7/19/2012
first contingent of soliders at UK

 

By Whitney Hale

In celebration of the University of Kentucky's upcoming sesquicentennial in 2015, the 15th of 150 weekly installments on the university explores World War I's impact on the institution.

War has always had a great impact on campus culture and the day-to-day lives of students. World War I was no different at UK. The university quickly responded to the demands of war by offering more convenient terms for academic credits for those students whose education was interrupted by military service. In 1918, the university contracted with the government for the training of military personnel in technical skills.

Between May and November of 1918, three detachments went through the training courses. Barker Hall’s Buell Armory became a workshop for truck maintenance and

7/18/2012
Rob Schneider

When Robert Schneider isn't touring around the world with band, Apples In Stereo, he's often working on one of his other great passions - math! The recent UK mathematics alum has just released a new math strategy game. Check out the video to see how the game looks and works:

 

 

 

You can also read the full article from the A.V. Club here

7/17/2012
julia johnson

 

By Whitney Hale, Amanda Osborne

Award-winning poets Kim Addonizio and Julia Johnson are among the featured presenters at this year's Kentucky Women Writers Conference being held Sept. 21-22, in Lexington. The literary festival will include sold out workshops with both poets, as well as readings and a craft talk that are open to all registrants.

One of the nation's most "provocative and edgy poets," Kim Addonizio is the California poet behind "Tell Me," a collection of poems that was a National Book Award Finalist. Her latest book "Lucifer at the Starlite" was a finalist for the Poets Prize and the Northern CA Book Award. Addonizio also wrote "Ordinary Genius: A Guide for the Poet Within," "Jimmy & Rita," "Little Beauties" and "My Dreams

7/16/2012
golding

 

By Sarah Geegan

Jonathan Golding, professor in the Department of Psychology in the UK College of Arts and Sciences, was recently featured in Inside Higher Education describing his integration of Facebook into his courses.

"When the idea of using social media (e.g., Facebook) as part of my face-to-face classes was suggested to me about two years ago, I found myself in the slow lane," Golding said. "Luckily, about a year ago I saw the proverbial light."

After all the years of teaching “mega-sections,” introductory courses with more than 500 students, Golding sought a way to create more meaningful interpersonal communication with students, as well as more

7/11/2012

Rhetoric in a Multi-Modal World: Craig Crowder https://wired.as.uky.edu/sites/default/files/Communication%20and%20Rhetoric%20in%20a%20Multi-Modal%20World_%20Craig%20Crowder.mp3

Written texts, YouTube videos, podcasts - these are all means of communicating ideas to others. Craig Crowder is a graduate student in the Department of English and teaches Composition & Communication classes, WRD 110 & 111. In this podcast, Crowder discusses ways to engage students via multimedia projects, and his research, which examines social movement rhetoric in a society

7/11/2012

By Gail Bennett, Sarah Geegan

WUKY 91.3 FM, the University of Kentucky's NPR station, is partnering with UK Army ROTC to present the Inaugural Kentucky National Guard Bluegrass Mud Run Saturday, Sept. 22, 2012. This 5K run will begin at UK's Commonwealth Stadium and proceed through obstacles designed by members of UK Army ROTC. The obstacle course will be challenging yet fun and will be made to get runners muddy. 

"This fun and exciting mud run is for the pro-athlete or the pro-couch potato!" said Gail Bennett, marketing director at WUKY." Everyone is encouraged to participate, and we strongly encourage you to have fun and even dress in your favorite or most bizarre costume

7/11/2012
doug boyd

By Ethan Levine, Whitney Hale

Crawfish Bottom was not the best neighborhood in the city of Frankfort, Ky. In fact, it was far from it. But a book from University of Kentucky oral historian Doug Boyd, recognized with a recent regional historic preservation award, sheds light not only on the area's notorious history but the love its residents had for their community.

The 50 acres of Crawfish Bottom on the north end of the state capital was better known for its crime rate and tough reputation than anything else, earning it the nickname "the lowest part of the city," or simply "bottom" for short. But if you dig beneath the "bottom," what you'll find is a neighborhood formerly filled with culture, history and lasting relationships.

A few years ago, Boyd, director of

7/10/2012

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman.

The Division of Writing, Rhetoric, and Digital Media is excited to welcome professor Steven Alvarez to its faculty!

Professor Alvarez joins us this fall to study composition, rhetoric, and literacy as they pertain to immigrant studies and bilingualism. He is currently working on an ethnographic study of first- and second-generation immigrant families in which children are bilingual, but parents are not, and how the children's acquisition of English skills shapes their family dynamics.

This podcast is part of a series highlighting the new faculty members who joined the College of Arts and Sciences in the fall 2012 semester.

7/10/2012
group photo

*This article first appeared in the U.S. Air Force Leader

 

By Cadet Brittney De Jaco

The morning was cloudy but bright, ominous of the fight that lay ahead, as young men and women from the detachments of the University of Kentucky, University of Cincinnati and University of Tennessee stepped onto the fields of Lexington, Ky. Cleats, gloves and jerseys were garnered as each individual began to prepare for the events to come. 

At 8:00 a.m. on April 14, cadets from the Universities of Kentucky, Cincinnati and Tennessee formed up on the fields for the colors to be presented and the National Anthem to be sung, officially signaling the start of the first annual Boone and Crockett Cup: "The Long Rifle" field day competition. 

The

7/9/2012

By: Colleen Glenn

There is a saying among geologists: the best geologist is the one who has seen the most rocks. Frank Ettensohn has seen a lot.

Ettensohn’s work concentrates on foreland basins and black oil and gas shales. Although he conducts the majority of his research in the Appalachian basin, Ettensohn keeps his passport handy, ready to journey to different locations to expand his range of knowledge.

From Ecuador to Argentina to Italy to Russia, the University of Kentucky Professor of Geology travels around the world studying rock formations, teaching courses, and presenting his research.

“We go on fieldtrips to see more rocks, to learn more,” Ettensohn said. “I know the Kentucky region very well, but, as a geologist, I want to go places where I can see new things.”

China, for

7/9/2012

High School students Nina Elliott, and Elizabeth "Lizzie" Walsh joined assistant professor Susan Odom in her chemistry lab, a partnership made possible through Paul Laurence Dunbar High School's Math, Science, and Technology Center.

7/9/2012
shoulder to shoulder

 

By Sarah Geegan, Craig Borie

Shoulder to Shoulder Global's May 2012 brigade to Ecuador marked the fifth anniversary of the Centro Médico Hombro a Hombro program in Santo Domingo, Ecuador. Students, faculty and staff from the UK College of Health Sciences, UK College of Arts and Sciences, Transylvania University as well as members of the community attended to 704 patients at the Centro Médico and partnering communities. 

Special activities for the fifth anniversary included a special celebration with community members and key partners to commemorate the occasion. Dr. Tom Young from the Department of Pediatrics in the UK College of Medicine and Dr. Claudia Hopenhayn from

7/6/2012

Story by Robin Roenker
Photo by Shaun Ring

On campus for only four months, Omani student Abdul Majeed Al-Hashmi is already making the most of his time at the University of Kentucky. In addition perfecting his already strong English in intensive 20-hour-per-week coursework at UK’s Center for English as a Second Language (CESL) in the College of Arts & Sciences, he’s also found time to pursue a new passion: opera singing.

“I love it,” said Al-Hashmi, a native of a small village called Adam in central Oman.

“In my country, I cannot sing opera, but here I take lessons. [In Oman] we have a very strict, traditional culture. But we came to America, and everything is changed now.”

“We love our country and our culture, but here, you can do what you

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