podcast

WRD 420: Feminist Rhetorics with Katherine Rogers-Carpenter

What do Aspasia (the companion of Pericles), Sojourner Truth (the orator of the famous "Ain't I a Woman?" speech), and the 1990s Riot Grrrl movement have in common? They will all be featured in Katherine Rogers-Carpenter's "Feminist Rhetorics" (WRD 420/A&S 300), which will examine the speeches and texts of women whose voices have led to lasting social changes in their community and in a global context. The class, which will trace feminist rhetorics from Ancient Greece to contemporary feminist theory, is one of Writing, Rhetoric, and Digital Media's groundbreaking course offerings for Spring 2012.

This podcast was produced by Christina Buckner.

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WRD 205: Screen/Writing with Joshua Abboud

Have you sent an email, written a text message, or posted on a social media site today? If you have, then you have communicated via screen. From the way televisions have shaped family dynamics in the home, to the way cell phones and computers have influenced grammar and penmanship, the screen pervades our ways of communicating. Joshua Abboud will address the interrelationship between the screen and writing in "Screen/Writing" (WRD 205/ENG 305), one of Writing, Rhetoric, and Digital Media's groundbreaking course offerings for Spring 2012.   

This podcast was produced by Christina Buckner.

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WRD 205: Rhetorics of Violence and Non-Violence with Beth Connors-Manke

Did you know that there is a new certificate in the works for Peace Studies? Beth Connors-Manke is teaching "Rhetorics of Violence and Non-Violence" (WRD 205/ENG 205) in Spring 2012, and it will be a component of that certification program. The class is one of Writing, Rhetoric and Digital Media's groundbreaking course offerings for Spring 2012.

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman.

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From Antiquity to the Present: The Jewish Studies Program with Jeremy Popkin

Jeremy Popkin is the T. Marshall Hahn, Jr. professor of History for the College of Arts and Sciences, and the director of the Jewish Studies Program, an interdisciplinary minor.

He has been named one of six finalists for the 2011 Cundill Prize in History, the world‘s largest nonfiction history book award, for his recent publication of "You Are All Free: The Haitian Revolution and the Abolition of Slavery."

The Jewish Studies Program will have its open-house event on Wednesday, October 19th, 2011, from 12 - 1:30 p.m. at the Bingham-Davis House (213 E. Maxwell Street).

This podcast was produced by Stephen Gordinier.

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Introducción al Departamento de Estudios Hispánicos / Introduction to the Department of Hispanic Studies: Alan Brown

Alan Brown is a Spanish professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Department of Hispanic Studies. In this podcast, Professor Brown discusses his new position in the department, his current research, and opportunities for students to connect to the community through the Department of Hispanic Studies. The conversation was held in Spanish. Below is an English translation.

 

A&S: You are listening to a University of Kentucky College of Arts & Sciences podcast. I’m Jonathan Beam. Alan Brown is a professor in the Department of Hispanic Studies and is the new Director of Undergraduate Studies. In this podcast, Professor Brown discusses his new position in the department, his current research, and opportunities to connect to the community through the Department of Hispanic Studies.

Brown: My name is Alan Brown and I am a Spanish professor interested in the acquisition of foreign languages, in this case, Spanish. My main areas of focus are the teaching, the pedagogy, and the acquisition of language. In addition to being a professor, I now have an administrative position, being the Director of Undergraduate Studies. So, I am in charge of finding equivalencies for transfer students or students that are studying abroad. Today, for example, I was with three or four students that either have already studied in Spain or are going to study there, and I have to evaluate the course descriptions to see if the classes they have taken or are going to take have an equivalent here in the department.

A&S:  Despite his new position, Professor Brown still continues with his research.

Brown: I’m still doing research. Right now, I’m researching the relationship between students’ final grades and their proficiency levels to see if there is a significant correlation between the two. In this case, these are students taking [Spanish]210 and 211, which are courses that act as a bridge between the basic level of [Spanish courses] 201 and 202 and an intermediate, slightly more advanced level. I’m also looking to see if there is a correlation between students’ final grades and the grades they receive on each project and component of the course. If there is no correlation, then we have to ask, “why?” Why would there not be a relationship between ability and command among the students when we assess them through an online test and their final grades? And what we are seeing is that maybe there isn’t much of a relationship between them.

A&S: Professor Brown also mentioned many ways students can volunteer and connect with the community, as well as an opportunity to study abroad in Ecuador.

Brown: They have sent me several opportunities for students. For example, the YMCA organization, I think the northside branch, is trying to strengthen their ties with the Hispanic people in the neighborhood. So they sent me a notice of possible volunteer jobs that work with Hispanics in this area. Also, a teacher from Athens-Chilesburg Elementary School contacted me looking for Spanish teachers that would teach after-school Spanish classes. And…. today, I am going to meet with people from the College of Medicine and the College of Health Sciences who go to Ecuador and conduct “Medical Brigades”. A physical therapy professor is going to lead a team of students that will offer medical services, and they want to bring Spanish students to serve as interpreters. 

A&S: Finally, Professor Brown explained the importance of having an international faculty and what it can offer students.

Brown: …Yes, I believe it’s extremely important. In the Department of Hispanic Studies, I’m in the minority. I’m a white, Anglo-Saxon, middle-class man, etc. and I’m in the minority. So I think that this [an international faculty] gives our students the opportunity to benefit from the perspectives that other people bring from their countries and their cultures. This is important, because I think a fundamental part of a college education is being able to expand one’s cultural horizons. And the best way to do this is to have direct contact with people that have different ideas and different perspectives having been born and raised in countries and in other cultures. This seems to be the most efficient way of reaching this goal of obtaining a broader education.

A&S:  Thanks for listening. And thanks to the College of Arts & Sciences and the Department of Hispanic Studies for making this podcast possible. 

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Dean's List Reception Fall 2011

Each semester, the College of Arts and Sciences honors its students which have made the Dean’s List. This semester, we talked with some of the honored students about their experiences at UK and how UK and a liberal arts education have helped them in their career goals.  Their varying majors, academic experiences, and plans for after college showcased the diversity of opportunities within the College of Arts and Sciences.

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UK Students Occupy Lexington

On October 5th, 2011, a group of students from the University of Kentucky joined a small march to the site of Occupy Lexington, a sister event to New York's ongoing Occupy Wall Street demonstrations. Students talk about their reasons for attending the event.

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman.

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UK Professors Lighting the Way

Solar energy has been around for a while now, but John Anthony, Michel Jabbour and Chi-Sing Man are part of a team that was recently awarded a National Science Foundation grant to develop new ways to catch and convert light to electricity. Anthony, a professor in the Department of Chemistry, describes the project, and his collaboration with mathematicians Jabbour and Man. 

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Oral Histories from Coal Country: Abby Kerins

Abby Kerins was a poster presenter at the Lexington Farmer's Market on September 17th, 2011. Inspired by Alessandro Portelli, author of They Say in Harlan County, Kerins' research involved listening to (and reading transcripts of) oral histories from the coal-rich region of Appalachian Kentucky. Kerins focused on the role of women during coal miners' strikes in the 20th century. Kerins was mentored by Sociology professor Joanna Badagliacco

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman.

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Kentucky SkyTalks with Tim Knauer

Tim Knauer is a professor for the department of Physics and Astronomy, and the director of the MacAdam Student Observatory. Each month, he hosts the Kentucky SkyTalks, an ongoing series of discussions on the science of life and the universe.

This podcast was produced by Stephen Gordinier.

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