podcast

Watch and Learn: Viewing the Vice Presidential Debate with International Students

The Center for English as a Second Language organized a discussion and viewing of the 2012 Vice Presidential debate, which gave students an opportunity to practice conversation and express their political opinions. In this podcast, students share some political insight, comparisons to politics in their home countries, and reactions to the debate. View the photos from this event here.

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman

 

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Cultivating Community: Homegrown Kentucky at Owsley County High School

Owsley County is the first site for Homegrown Kentucky, a farm-to-school project developed by University of Kentucky students Ben Smith, Adam Meredith, Luke McAnally, Patrick Johnson and Ben Norton. Ideally, this model will be applied to other schools across Kentucky, making Kentucky schools more self-sufficient while offering students and community members an opportunity to learn and practice agricultural skills. This podcast chronicles a visit to Owsley County High School for a board meeting and tour of the farm, which consists of a few acres adjacent to the school. Agricultural Science teacher Dustin Estridge and some of his students share their experiences with the project. 

You can also view the photos from our trip.

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman.

 

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Continuity and Change in American Politics: Stephen Voss

What can we tell about future elections by observing the past? Political scientist Stephen Voss gives us a few examples from past elections - and analyzes some recent developments - in order to articulate the ways that electoral votes can slide from one place to another and disrupt the electoral trends of the past. From population shifts to industrial boom and bust, the United States is in a state of change, and so are its Presidential elections. 

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman.

 

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City Government from the Inside Out: Jim Newberry

The UK Political Science department chose someone with experience and a solid educational background to present a topical seminar on local government: former Lexington Mayor Jim Newberry. This semester, he's showing students how local governments work by bringing in guest speakers each week from various local governments around the region. Students facilitate the discussions, and experts impart their knowledge and experience to the course. In this podcast, Newberry shares his experiences as a professor and some of the aspects of local government discussed in the course. 

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman.

 

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DNA Criminology and Chemistry: John Brown

John Brown served with the Federal Bureau of Investigation for more than two decades. He served in many capacities, including as a serology examiner, special agent, investigator, and was program manager for the development of the National DNA Indexing System. In this podcast, Brown describes some of his work with the Bureau and how taking chemistry courses at UK gave a solid foundation for the career path he chose. 

This podcast was produced by Stephen Gordinier. 

 

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Money's Role in the 2012 Election: Don Gross

By the time this year's Presidential election rolls around, many voters will be as turned off as they are excited. Why? The constant presence of political ads that saturate almost every nook and cranny of the media market. But what makes these ads possible? The answer is the incredible influx of money into modern politics that is used to bludgeon as often as it is to persuade and inform voters.

University of Kentucky political science professor Don Gross joined us for a conversation about this very topic. A thirty-six year veteran of UK, Professor Gross has examined the ins-and-outs of campaign finance and he helps explain the role of money in politics today while also shedding light on many of this election's great unknowns. 
 
 
This podcast was produced by Patrick O'Dowd.
 

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The Science Behind What We Drink: Rita Basuray

The fluids we drink can hold cultural and historical significance -- but what about the way they affect our physiology? A new course, A&S 100-024, The Science Behind What We Drink, is professor Rita Basuray’s fusion of the two. By examining the role of water, beer, wine, spirits, coffee, tea, and cola in terms of historical significance and the ways in which they interact with the human body, the class will connect science and the humanities. Basuray’s class is also bridging the gap between campus and community by bringing in local businesses such as Mon Tea and campus organizations like the UK office of Substance Education & Responsibility to the course. 

For more information about the course, contact Rita Basuray: rita.basuray@uky.edu. To enroll, please contact your academic advisor.

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman.

 

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Philosophy and Modern Life: David Bradshaw

From capitalism to transhumanism, the modern world is rife with uncertainty about the nature of society, ethical issues that surround technology, and places where the humanities and sciences intersect. The Philosophy and Modern Life series seeks to explore those issues throughout the fall. David Bradshaw from the Department of Philosophy gives a run-down of this semester's offerings. 

All events are free and open to the public, and the series is sponsored by the Philosophy Department.

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman.

 

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WUKY's 'UK Perspectives' Features Student-athletes in the Honors Program

Today's program features two UK students who excel in both the classroom and on the field. Freshman soccer midfielder Cailin Harris and sophomore decathlete Daniel Buckles are also in the UK Honors Program.

Getting To Know Lexington: Community 101

For many, moving to a new place is part of the college experience - but at UK, students can take a class that connects them to many community organizations and civic institutions. Community 101 is a course designed to help incoming students get their bearings in Lexington, Kentucky. Guest lecturers come to class frequently, and students get to engage with the local organization of their choice for a final project.

At the end of the 2012 spring semester, final projects were on display at the Singletary Art Museum as part of the city-wide Gallery Hop. The A&S Podcast team visited the gallery to see the final projects and chat with some of the students and teachers from the course. 

This 2-credit course will be offered again in Fall 2012 and class will begin on September 18.

**You can register until Wednesday, September 26. A&S students can go to room 311 Patterson Office Tower, students in other Colleges should see their advisor.
  

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman.

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