anthropology

"Long Time Ago..." A Performance by Crit Callebs, Eastern Band Cherokee Storyteller

 

 

Crit Callebs (Eastern Band Cherokee descendant) is a traditional hunter, food gatherer, and fire-tender and lives on the Yakama Nation Indian Reservation. He is completing his Master’s Degree at Central Washington University (CWU) in Cultural Resource Management with an expertise in treaty rights concerning Indian hunting and fishing. He served as the Native American Liaison at the Center for Diversity and Social Justice and was a very popular guest lecturer for the American Indian Studies program. Crit is a trainer for the “Since Time Immemorial” tribal sovereignty and history curriculum implemented in K-12 classrooms in Washington State. As an active member of the Northwest Indian Storytelling Association he has been a featured storyteller for the Tseil-Waututh Nation, CWU Museum of Culture and Environment, Colville Tribes Youth “Warrior Camp” and is the 2014 Alaska Spirit of Reading storyteller. Crit is also a professional survival trainer and former instructor for the world renowned Boulder Outdoors Survival School. One of his great passions is teaching youth and adults how to be self-reliant in the wilderness. Using his gift of storytelling, he travels throughout the U.S. and Canada sharing traditional stories, teaching cultural camps and conducting workshops that promote self-awareness, ancestral skills, and Indigenous values.

 

 

Office Hours with Katherine Rogers-Carpenter and Erin Koch

Episode seven of Office Hours is here! Join us as we talk to Doctor Katherine Rogers-Carpenter and Doctor Erin Koch their work and interests. Talking points include the new Health, Society and Populations major, visual rhetoric, and tuberculosis from both scientific and artistic points of view.

Office Hours is produced by the College of Arts & Sciences and airs on WRFL FM 88.1 every Wednesday from 2-3 p.m. This podcast was produced by David Cole.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Long Time Ago... A Performance by Crit Callebs Eastern Band Cherokee Storyteller

 
Crit Callebs (Eastern Band Cherokee descendant) is a traditional hunter, food gatherer, and fire-tender and lives on the Yakama Nation Indian Reservation. He is completing his Master’s Degree at Central Washington University (CWU) in Cultural Resource Management with an expertise in treaty rights concerning Indian hunting and fishing. He served as the Native American Liaison at the Center for Diversity and Social Justice and was a very popular guest lecturer for the American Indian Studies program. Crit is a trainer for the “Since Time Immemorial” tribal sovereignty and history curriculum implemented in K-12 classrooms in Washington State. As an active member of the Northwest Indian Storytelling Association he has been a featured storyteller for the Tseil-Waututh Nation, CWU Museum of Culture and Environment, Colville Tribes Youth “Warrior Camp” and is the 2014 Alaska Spirit of Reading storyteller. Crit is also a professional survival trainer and former instructor for the world renowned Boulder Outdoors Survival School. One of his great passions is teaching youth and adults how to be self-reliant in the wilderness. Using his gift of storytelling, he travels throughout the U.S. and Canada sharing traditional stories, teaching cultural camps and conducting workshops that promote self-awareness, ancestral skills, and Indigenous values.
 
Date: 
Wednesday, October 29, 2014 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
The Niles Gallery -- Lucille Fine Arts Library

Office Hours with Mary K. Anglin and Matt Page

Join us for this fourth episode of Office Hours, where we talk to Professor Mary K. Anglin about her research on breast cancer and the Appalachian region, and Professor Matt Page about his work in music. Office Hours is produced by the College of Arts & Sciences and airs on WRFL FM 88.1 every Wednesday from 2-3 p.m.

This podcast was produced by David Cole.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Red River Gorge: Site of Living Archaeology Weekend

In proclaiming September as Kentucky Archaeology Month, Gov. Steve Beshear recognized the success of Living Archaeology Weekend, Kentucky's oldest and largest public archaeology event.

Introducing the book: Landesque Capital: The Historical Ecology of Enduring Landscape Transformations.


 

Date: 
Friday, October 3, 2014 - 4:15pm
Location: 
Lafferty Hall Rm. 213
Type of Event (for grouping events):

Gov. Steve Beshear proclaims September as Kentucky Archaeology Month

The proclamation credits the Kentucky Office of State Archaeology, located within UK's Department of Anthropology, and the Kentucky Heritage Council/State Historic Preservation Office for maintaining an extensive and growing database of thousands of archaeological sites across the state.

Office Hours with Srimati Basu and Edward Kasarskis

Join us for the first episode of Office Hours, where we talk to Professor Srimati Basu about family law in India and Doctor Edward Kasarskis about Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and the Ice Bucket Challenge. Office Hours is produced by the College of Arts & Sciences and airs on WRFL FM 88.1 every Wednesday from 2-3 p.m.

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman.


Office Hours with Srimati Basu and Edward Kasarskis is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

They Preserve the Past for the Future

Adjunct Assistant Professors A. Gwynn Henderson and David Pollack have been award this year's Ida Lee Willis Memorial Award for outstanding commitment to historical preservation.

Anthro Colloquium: Dr. William Y. Adams, "The Boasians"

Professor Emeritus, U Kentucky. He is the winner of the 1978 Herskovits Prize for his history of Nubia, Nubia: Corridor to Africa. In 2005 Adams was awarded the Order of the Two Niles, Sudan's highest civilian honor, for his contributions to Nubian history. Adams's work in Nubia began in 1959 as part of the UNESCO archaeological salvage campaign to excavate sites threatened by the rising flood waters of Lake Nasser following the construction of the Aswan Dam.

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