kim mcbride

Public Invited to Archaeological Tours

Archeologists at the Kentucky Archaeological Survey and the University of Kentucky will lead a guided tour of historic features and artifacts uncovered at Ashland - The Henry Clay Estate.

UK Archaeologist Digs Up Kentucky History on National TV

 

 

The Hatfield-McCoy Feud is now infamous across the country thanks to the mini-series that aired in 2012. Thanks to the help of UK Professor Kim McBride, the National Geographic Channel's "Diggers" recently made an important discovery about this famous feud. "Diggers: Hatfields & McCoys" airs Tuesday, January 29 on National Geographic Channel.

This story first appeared on UKNow, the University of Kentucky's official news source. Visit http://uknow.uky.edu. A direct link to this story is uknow.uky.edu/content/uk-archaeologist-helps-unearth-hatfield-and-mccoy-artifacts

 

 

UK Archaeologist Helps Unearth Hatfield and McCoy Artifacts

A notorious feud between the Hatfields of West Virginia and the McCoys of Kentucky is once again making national news, but this time it is hitting a little closer to home. A discovery of artifacts associated with patriarch Randall McCoy’s home and site of an infamous 1888 attack were confirmed by Kim McBride, a historic archaeologist with the Kentucky Archaeological Survey, a joint partnership with the University of Kentucky Department of Anthropology and the Kentucky Heritage Council/State Historic Preservation Office.

UK Archaeology Project Featured in American Archaeology Magazine

Adjunct Anthropology Professor Kim McBride's 22 years of archaeological work at Pleasant Hill, a former Shaker community approximately 30 miles southwest of Lexington, was recently featured in the national publication, American Archaeology magazine. The magazine's seven-page feature highlights McBride's extensive work at Pleasant Hill, which includes directing a series of field schools in which more than 100 students have located former building sites throughout the village.

Anthropology Students at Shaker Village Time Lapse

Kim McBride, anthropology professor and co-director of the Kentucky Archaeological Survey, taught Anthropology 585: Field Methods in Archaeology at the Shaker Village of Pleasant Hill, 25 miles southwest of Lexington. Students enrolled in the six-week course excavated, collected artifacts and interpreted findings from the sites of two early 19th century Shaker buildings from May 8-June 19. Read more: as.uky.edu/uk-archaeology-students-gain-ground-through-field-school

Anthropology Students Time Lapse: Shaker Village Archaeological Dig

Kim McBride, anthropology professor and co-director of the Kentucky Archaeological Survey, taught Anthropology 585: Field Methods in Archaeology at the Shaker Village of Pleasant Hill, 25 miles southwest of Lexington. Students enrolled in the six-week course excavated, collected artifacts and interpreted findings from the sites of two early 19th century Shaker buildings from May 8-June 19. Read more: as.uky.edu/uk-archaeology-students-gain-ground-through-field-school
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